Be aware of Wildlife.

Whether your activity is during the summer or winter, on land on water, anywhere in Canada, remember the tips and follow the steps.

Bear Safety

Black bears are found in 12 of Canada’s provinces and territories, while grizzly bears are located in western provinces and northern territories. Though these areas are natural bear habitat, increasing human development and access pose a serious threat. We must respect the fact that the wilderness is home to bears, and as visitors we must do our part to help conserve bears and their environment.

In the know…

  • Learn everything you can about bears before venturing into their habitat.

  • Check for reported bear activity where you’re headed. Park wardens, wildlife officers, and even signs posted at the trail head can be of help.

  • Be alert and pay attention for bears and signs of bear activity.

  • Alert potential bears to your presence by singing or talking calmly and loudly.

Bear Safety

Black bears are found in 12 of Canada’s provinces and territories, while grizzly bears are located in western provinces and northern territories. Though these areas are natural bear habitat, increasing human development and access pose a serious threat. We must respect the fact that the wilderness is home to bears, and as visitors we must do our part to help conserve bears and their environment.

In the know…

  • Learn everything you can about bears before venturing into their habitat.

  • Check for reported bear activity where you’re headed. Park wardens, wildlife officers, and even signs posted at the trail head can be of help.

  • Be alert and pay attention for bears and signs of bear activity.

  • Alert potential bears to your presence by singing or talking calmly and loudly.

Cool, calm, collected…

  • If you see a bear in the distance, steer clear. Don’t approach for a photo or a closer look.

  • NEVER feed a bear either intentionally or by mistake. Pack out what you pack in.

  • If you have a close encounter, remain still and stay calm. Do not run – attacks are rare. Have your deterrent at the ready, slowly increase your distance from the bear and move out of the area.

The right gear:

 

  • Roomy backpack that can shift up to cover your head and neck.
  • Binoculars to spot bears at a safe distance.
  • Bear spray or another deterrent such as bear bangers, flares, siren, fog/signal horn. Know how to use them.
  • Bear-resistant food canister.

Cougar Safety

The beautiful reddish-brown to grey-brown cougar is generally found in southwest Alberta and the lower third of British Columbia. Although there have been a few sightings in other provinces, the cougar is endangered in eastern Canada. Cougar sightings are rare and direct attacks on humans are even rarer; however, when humans venture into the backcountry, we bring ourselves into the heart of cougar territory.

Though you may consider yourself fortunate to sight a cougar in the wild, these beautiful predatory creatures are unpredictable. If you do experience a confrontation with a cougar or feel threatened by one, immediately inform the nearest office of the Conservation Officer Service. Learn as much as you can about cougar behavior before you head out, and act responsibly while sharing their natural habitat.

In the know…

  • Hike in groups and alert potential cougars to your presence by singing or talking calmly and loudly.

  • Be alert and pay attention for signs of cougar tracks and activity.

  • Carry a strong walking stick that can be used as a weapon in a pinch.

Cougar Safety

The beautiful reddish-brown to grey-brown cougar is generally found in southwest Alberta and the lower third of British Columbia. Although there have been a few sightings in other provinces, the cougar is endangered in eastern Canada. Cougar sightings are rare and direct attacks on humans are even rarer; however, when humans venture into the backcountry, we bring ourselves into the heart of cougar territory.

Though you may consider yourself fortunate to sight a cougar in the wild, these beautiful predatory creatures are unpredictable. If you do experience a confrontation with a cougar or feel threatened by one, immediately inform the nearest office of the Conservation Officer Service. Learn as much as you can about cougar behavior before you head out, and act responsibly while sharing their natural habitat.

In the know…

  • Hike in groups and alert potential cougars to your presence by singing or talking calmly and loudly.

  • Be alert and pay attention for signs of cougar tracks and activity.

  • Carry a strong walking stick that can be used as a weapon in a pinch.

Cool, calm, collected…

  • If you see a cougar in the distance, steer clear. Don’t approach for a photo or a closer look. Cougars are unpredictable.

  • If you have a close encounter, stay calm, stand tall and slowly back away from the cougar while talking to it in a confident tone.

  • Immediately pick up any children or pets.

  • NEVER turn your back on or run from a cougar. Keep direct eye contact with the cougar at all times and give it an escape route.

  • If a cougar acts aggressively toward you, make yourself appear larger than life – open your jacket, or pick up sticks, branches, or your mountain bike (if you’re out riding) and wave them above your head. Show it you are a threat.

  • If a cougar attacks, fight back with everything you’ve got – sticks, rocks, backpack, fists…anything!

Enjoy Canada’s vast wilderness and make those rare cougar sightings positive ones.

The right gear:

 

  • Binoculars to spot cougars at a safe distance.
  • Sturdy walking stick.

Safety Topics

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